Northern Pass holds Open House for residents of 4 towns



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Northern Pass Transmission project engineer Brian Bosse, left, discussed the proposed high-voltage, direct current overhead lines and towers in an existing PSNH right-of-way in Lancaster with Jon Quay of Lancaster at the Sept. 10 Open House held at the Cabot Motor Inn. (click for larger version)
September 18, 2013
LANCASTER — The Northern Pass Transmission project provided a chance on Tuesday, Sept. 10, for landowners and other stakeholders to learn some specific details about the overhead lines proposed to be erected on existing rights-of-way (ROW) in three Cos towns: Lancaster, Whitefield and Dalton, plus Bethlehem in Grafton County. Fifty people attended, according to Martin Murray, Manager, Media Relations NH for

PSNH, a subsidiary of Northeast Utilities.

Software packages made it possible for landowners to see how tall the proposed towers on their property would be, if built, and their exact location.

The proposed overhead line in the existing ROW in Lancaster would run almost due south from the Northumberland town line, 5.6 miles to the Whitefield town line, crossing Route 2 below Roger's Campground. The minimum structure height would be 70 feet tall and the maximum 110 feet, with the most common, 85 feet. Today, the most common height is 43 feet tall.

If approved, based on use of the proposed route, NPT would invest some $18.3 million in the county seat, yielding an estimated $354,338 annually in local property tax payments: $267,360 in municipal and local education taxes; and $86,978 in Cos County taxes. NPT's percentage of the town's total property value would be eight percent.

Whitefield would have 10.4 miles of overhead HVDC lines, nearly twice as many as Lancaster. The minimum tower height would be 80 feet tall, and the maximum 115 feet, with the most common 90 feet.

If approved, based on use of the proposed route, NPT would invest approximately $32.1 million in Whitefield, providing an estimated $743,664 annually in local property tax payments: $584,992 in municipal and local education; and $158,672 in Cos County taxes. NPT's total percentage of the town's total property value would be a whopping 20 percent.

In contrast, Dalton would have 2.1 miles of overhead HVDC lines with a minimum tower height of 75 feet and a maximum of 130 feet. The most common height would be 90 feet, more than double today's most common height of 43 feet.

If approved, based on use of the proposed route, NPT would invest approximately $7.8 million in Dalton, providing an estimated $142,056 annually in local property tax payments: municipal and local education, $106,953; and Cos County, $35,103.

NPT's total percentage of total property value would be nine percent.

In Bethlehem, 7.4 miles of proposed NPT overhead lines would be run in existing rights-of-way. The minimum tower height would be 70 feet and the maximum, 125 feet. Today the most common height is 43 feet, with a maximum of 57 feet.

If approved, based on use of the proposed route, NPT would invest approximately $26.9 million in Bethlehem, proving an estimated $717,949 annually in local property tax payments: $672,557 in municipal and local education taxes; and $45,342 in Grafton County taxes.

NPT's percent of total property value would be 11 percent.

Northern Pass has scheduled an additional Open House on Wednesday, October 23, at the Sunset Hill Inn in Sugar Hill at which visitors can stop by anytime between 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. to discuss the project with engineers and other team members.

Northern Pass spokesman point out that these open houses are voluntary efforts designed so that they can share information with residents and landowners. A complete schedule is available on NPT's website, northernpass.us, or by phone at 1-800-286-7305.

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